WSET Level 3 Lecture #3: Human Influences in the Winery (Wine Tasting)

This post summarises the tasting session on 18-Jan-2017, the first of the 15 lectures from WSET Level 3 course which runs from 4-Jan-17 to 19-Apr-17. The theory part is covered separately in the previous post. The exact details of wine samples and the price information is included below. So, if you wish, you can do your own tasting by yourself!

  • Tasting Location: WSET London, Vintners Hall 1
  • Date & Time: 18th January 2017, 6:30 pm
1. Wine #1
1. Wine Information
1.1. Wine Name Glenelly Chardonnay Unwooded
1.2. Country South Africa 
1.3. Region Stellenbosch
1.4. Sub-region  
1.5. Vintage 2014
1.6. Quality Status Wine of Origin 
1.7. Producer Glenelly 
1.8. ABV 13 
1.9. Retail Price (£) £10.99 
2. Appearance
2.1. Clarity clear
2.2. Intensity pale 
2.3. Colour lemon 
2.4. Other n/a 
3. Nose
3.1. Condition clean
3.2. Intensity medium 
3.3. Aroma Characteristics
  • Primary: pear, apple, lemon, citrus, <white peach>, <blossom>
  • Secondary: <creamy>
3.4. Development youthful 
4. Palate
4.1. Sweetness dry
4.2. Acidity <medium +> (not high)
4.3. Tannin n/a 
4.4. Alcohol medium
4.5. Body <medium> (not light)
4.6. Mousse n/a 
4.7. Flavour Intensity medium 
4.8. Flavour Characteristics
  • Primary: pear, apple, lemon, citrus, <white peach>
  • Secondary: <creamy>
4.9. Finish medium 
5. Conclusion
5.1. Quality Level
  • Balance: y
  • Length: y
  • Intensity: n
  • Complexity: n
  • Conclusion: Good
5.2. Readiness for Drinking/ Potential for Ageing drink now, not suitable for ageing 
5.3. Thoughts
  • No oak, no MLF, earlier harvest, natural yeast, lees
  • Interesting to compare with wine #2, as they are from the same producer, yet different winemaking techniques
  • I struggled to pick up the creaminess
2. Wine #2
1. Wine Information
1.1. Wine Name Grand Vin de Glenelly Chardonnay
1.2. Country South Africa 
1.3. Region Stellenbosch
1.4. Sub-region  
1.5. Vintage 2013 
1.6. Quality Status Wine of Origin 
1.7. Producer Glenelly 
1.8. ABV 13
1.9. Retail Price (£) £14.99 
2. Appearance
2.1. Clarity clear
2.2. Intensity medium 
2.3. Colour lemon 
2.4. Other tears 
3. Nose
3.1. Condition clean
3.2. Intensity <pronounced> (not medium?)  
3.3. Aroma Characteristics
  • Primary: peach, apricot, <melon> 
  • Secondary: vanilla, toast, butter, cloves (MLF & oak)
  • Tertiary: nutty, honey
3.4. Development developing (tertiary notes)  
4. Palate
4.1. Sweetness dry 
4.2. Acidity medium+ 
4.3. Tannin n/a  
4.4. Alcohol medium  
4.5. Body medium+ 
4.6. Mousse n/a  
4.7. Flavour Intensity medium+ 
4.8. Flavour Characteristics
  • Primary: peach, apricot, <melon> 
  • Secondary: vanilla, toast, butter, cloves 
  • Tertiary: nutty, honey
4.9. Finish long
5. Conclusion
5.1. Quality Level
  • Balance: y
  • Length: y
  • Intensity: y
  • Complexity: y
  • Conclusion: Very good
5.2. Readiness for Drinking/ Potential for Ageing can drink now, but has potential for ageing  
5.3. Thoughts
  • Oak, MLF, later harvest (riper fruit), lees, natural yeast – good contrast to wine#1 about winemaking techniques and the outcome in the final product
  • More Secondary & Tertiary notes on the palate than the nose – Yet, I struggled to detect them
3. Wine #3
1. Wine Information
1.1. Wine Name Jacob’s Creek Classic Shiraz 
1.2. Country Australia   
1.3. Region South Eastern Australia 
1.4. Sub-region  
1.5. Vintage 2015
1.6. Quality Status wine with geographical description
1.7. Producer Jacob Creek wines  
1.8. ABV 14  
1.9. Retail Price (£) £7.49  
2. Appearance
2.1. Clarity clear
2.2. Intensity medium
2.3. Colour ruby
2.4. Other n/a  
3. Nose
3.1. Condition clean 
3.2. Intensity medium
3.3. Aroma Characteristics
  • Primary: <plum>, <blackberry>, <black pepper>
  • Secondary: <clove>
3.4. Development youthful 
4. Palate
4.1. Sweetness dry 
4.2. Acidity medium (I thought this was high) 
4.3. Tannin <medium-> (I thought this was light)
4.4. Alcohol medium
4.5. Body medium
4.6. Mousse n/a
4.7. Flavour Intensity medium 
4.8. Flavour Characteristics
  • Primary: <plum>, <blackberry>, <black pepper>
  • Secondary: <clove>
4.9. Finish medium
5. Conclusion
5.1. Quality Level
  • Balance: y
  • Length: y
  • Intensity: n
  • Complexity: n
  • Conclusion: Good
5.2. Readiness for Drinking/ Potential for Ageing drink now, not suitable for ageing 
5.3. Thoughts
  • I struggle to pick up most of the notes on the nose as well as on the palate – what is the aroma and flavour of a clove? Something to check next time I go to a supermarket!
  • This wine is a typical example of high-yield winemaking
4. Wine #4
1. Wine Information
1.1. Wine Name Ben Glaetzer Bishop Barossa Shiraz
1.2. Country Australia
1.3. Region South Australia
1.4. Sub-region Barossa Valley
1.5. Vintage 2014
1.6. Quality Status wine with geographical description
1.7. Producer Glaetzer Wines  
1.8. ABV 14.5  
1.9. Retail Price (£) £21.99  
2. Appearance
2.1. Clarity clear
2.2. Intensity deep
2.3. Colour ruby 
2.4. Other  
3. Nose
3.1. Condition clean
3.2. Intensity pronounced
3.3. Aroma Characteristics
  • Primary: <black cherry>, <black pepper>
  • Secondary: <smoke>, <toast>, <vanilla>
  • Tertiary: <leather>, <savoury>, <mushroom>
3.4. Development developing 
4. Palate
4.1. Sweetness dry 
4.2. Acidity high 
4.3. Tannin medium+   
4.4. Alcohol high 
4.5. Body full
4.6. Mousse n/a  
4.7. Flavour Intensity pronounced 
4.8. Flavour Characteristics
  • Primary: <black cherry>, <black pepper>
  • Secondary: <smoke>, <toast>, <vanilla>
  • Tertiary: <leather>, <savoury>, <mushroom>
4.9. Finish long 
5. Conclusion
5.1. Quality Level
  • Balance: y
  • Length: y
  • Intensity: y
  • Complexity: y
  • Conclusion: Outstanding
5.2. Readiness for Drinking/ Potential for Ageing drink now, but has potential for ageing 
5.3. Thoughts
  • Same grape variety from a same country as wine #3, but the difference is noticeable – this is due to the various factors, especially the winemaking techniques
  • Better quality grapes, oak ageing, old vines, open-wood fermentation, extended maceration

5. My Thoughts

In this lecture, I could compare how the winemaking techniques can result a big difference to the final product. It was quite interesting as there were two wines from the same grape variety and even from a same producer.

Yet, I was somewhat exhausted to attend the class, and it clearly affected my wine tasting. Maybe I was just tired after a long day at work. Anyhow, it was just one of those days, difficult to concentrate during the class and difficult to enjoy the wine tasting.

1 Comment

  1. Jooh
    15 Feb 2017

    Hope you are enjoying today’s session:D xxx

    Reply

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